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About Plano

Plano, Texas

 

 

 

 

 

Plano (/ˈpln/ play-noh) is a city in the state of Texas, located mostly within Collin County.

The city's population was 269,776 at the 2010 census, making it the ninth most populous city in the state of Texas(Corpus Christi is ranked at #8 and Laredo is ranked at #10) and the 70th most populous city in the United States. Plano is twenty miles northeast of downtown Dallas. This city is home to many corporate headquarters:Alliance Data, Cinemark Theatres, Dell Services, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Ericsson, Frito-Lay, HP Enterprise Services, Huawei, J. C. Penney, Pizza Hut, Rent-A-Center, Traxxas, Siemens PLM Software, and Toyota Motors USA.

In 2005, 2006, and 2011, Plano was designated the best place to live in the Western United States by CNN Moneymagazine. In 2006, Plano was selected as the 11th best place to live in the United States by CNN Moneymagazine. It was also selected as the safest city in America in 2010 and 2011 by Forbes. Plano schools consistently score among the highest in the nation. Plano was rated the 10th Best Suburb for Education in the Nation in 2014 due to having one of the lowest student-teacher ratios (14 to 1), a high school graduation rate of 94 percent and some of the highest test scores in the nation. It has been rated as the wealthiest city in the United States by CNN Money, and the United States Census Bureau declared Plano the wealthiest city of 2008 by comparing the median household income for all U.S. cities whose populations were greater than 250,000. In 2008, Forbes.com selected Plano, University Park, and Highland Park as the three "Top Suburbs To Live Well" of Dallas. The annual Plano Balloon Festival and the Plano International Festival are two of the city's premier cultural and entertainment events.

 

 

 

 

 

 

City
City of Plano
Granite Park in May 2011
Granite Park in May 2011
Flag of Plano, Texas
Flag
Official logo of Plano, Texas
Logo
Nickname(s): Gymnastics Capital of the World[1]
Location of Plano in Collin County, Texas
Location of Plano in Collin County, Texas
Map of USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Plano has a total area of 71.6 square miles (185.5 km2).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parks and recreation

Dickens in Downtown Plano 2014 Lighting of the Tree

Although Plano is named for the flat plains of the area, large trees abound in the city's many parks. One such tree, estimated to be over 500 years old, resides in Bob Woodruff park near Rowlett Creek on the city's east side

The two main Open Space Preserves, Bob Woodruff Park (321 acres) and Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve (801 acres), are connected by biking trails making the green space one large uninterrupted park space that is larger than Central Park in New York City (840 acres). Total acreage of all spaces managed by the Parks department currently totals 3,830.81. The Plano Master Plan has the acreage growing to 4,092.63 when complete.

There are five recreation centers. They are Tom Muehlenbeck Center, Carpenter Park Recreation Center, Oak Point Recreation Center, Liberty Recreation Center, and Douglass Community Center.

The City of Plano also owns and operates three performing arts venues under the auspices of the Parks and Recreation Department. These venues include the Courtyard Theater, the Cox Playhouse, and the Amphitheater at Oak Point Park. A fourth performance venue, McCall Plaza, is currently under construction in the historic Downtown Plano neighborhood.[38]

  • Neighborhood Parks: 249.13 acres
  • Linear Parks: 629.27 acres
  • Community Parks: 1,120.65 acres
  • Open Space Preserves: 1,324.13 acres
  • Special Use Areas: 46.57 acres
  • Golf Courses: 461.06 acres

 

 

 

 

 

History

Plano, Texas in 1891. Tonedlithograph by A.E. Downs, Boston. Published by T. M. Fowler & James B. Moyer. Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

Settlers came to the area near present-day Plano in the early 1840s.Facilities such as a sawmill, a gristmill, and a store soon brought more people to the area. Mail service was established, and after rejecting several names for the budding town (including naming it in honor of then-President Millard Fillmore), the locals suggested the name Plano (from the Spanish word for "flat"), as a reference to the local terrain. The name was accepted by the post office. In 1872, the completion of the Houston and Central Texas Railway helped the city grow, and the city was officially incorporated in 1873. The population grew to more than 500 by 1874. In 1881, a fire raged through the central business district, destroying most of the buildings. The town was rebuilt and business again flourished through the 1880s. Also in 1881, the city assumed responsibility for what would eventually become Plano Independent School District (PISD), ending the days of Plano being served only by private schools.

The population of Plano initially grew slowly, reaching 1,304 in 1900 and increasing to 3,695 in 1960. By 1970, Plano began to feel some of the boom its neighbors had experienced after World War II. A series of public works projects and a change in taxes that removed the farming community from the town helped increase the overall population of Plano. In 1970, the population reached 17,872, and by 1980, it had exploded to 72,000. Sewers, schools and street development kept pace with this massive increase, largely because of Plano's flat topography, grid layout and planning initiatives.

In 1981 the Plano City Council adopted the city’s official logo based on a design submitted via a community contest by longtime Plano resident James R. (Jim) Wainner, a professional artist and graphic designer.

During the 1980s, many large corporations moved their headquarters to Plano, including J. C. Penney and Frito-Lay, which helped the city grow. By 1990, the population reached 128,713, dwarfing the county seat of McKinney. In 1994, the city was recognized as an All-America City. By 2000, the population grew to 222,030, making it one of the largest suburbs of Dallas. Plano is completely locked in by other municipalities and cannot expand in area, and there is little undeveloped land remaining within the city limits. However, one large tract of land is being developed as of July 2012. Turnpike Commons at the intersection of Renner Rd and the George Bush Turnpike (bordered also by Shiloh Rd to the east). The development will feature apartments, medical facilities, restaurants, a Race Trac gas station, and a hotel.

In 2013, Plano received top-scoring nationally in a livability index according to an algorithm created by AreaVibes.com, a Toronto-based company specializing in such data. The chart can be found here Best Places to Live in America. AreaVibes ranked Plano at the top of the list of U.S. cities with populations between 100,000 and 10,000,000. Another chart, Best Places to Live in 2013, also has Plano ranked number 1. Follow this link to see the chart Top 10 Best Places to Live.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plano,_Texas

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